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All about sunburn symptoms of sunburn causes of sunburn treatments for sunburns sunburn protection

What is sunburn?

Sunburn is a visible reaction of the skin's exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, the invisible rays that are part of sunlight. Ultraviolet rays can also cause invisible damage to the skin. Excessive and/or multiple sunburns cause premature aging of the skin and lead to skin cancer. Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the US, and exposure to the sun is the

leading cause of skin cancer.

Sunburn is a visible reaction of the skin's exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, the invisible rays that are part of sunlight. Ultraviolet rays can also cause invisible damage to the skin. Excessive and/or multiple sunburns cause premature aging of the skin and lead to skin cancer. Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the US and exposure to the sun is the leading cause of skin cancer.

Sunburn results from too much sun or sun-equivalent exposure. Almost everyone has been sunburned or will become sunburned at some time in their life. Anyone who has visited a beach, gone fishing, worked in the yard, or simply been out in the sun can get sunburn. Improper tanning bed use is also a source of sunburn. Although seldom fatal, sunburn can be disabling and cause quite a bit of discomfort.

Children often spend a good part of their day playing outdoors in the sun, especially during the summer. Children who have fair skin, moles, or freckles, or who have a family history of skin cancer, are more likely to develop skin cancer in later years.

UV rays are strongest during summer months when the sun is directly overhead (normally between 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.). UV rays are a type of radiation energy, which are given out by the sun and sun beds/tanning lamps. There are three types of UV rays; A, B, and C. Only UV-A and UV-B rays can reach the earth. UV-B rays have long been known to damage skin. However in recent years it has been suggested that UV-A rays may be dangerous to the skin as well.

More information on sunburn

What is sunburn? - Sunburn is a visible reaction of the skin's exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, the invisible rays that are part of sunlight.
What are the symptoms of sunburn? - Sunburn results in painful, reddened skin. Severe sunburn may produce swelling and blisters. The symptoms of a sunburn may resemble other medical conditions or problems.
What causes sunburn? - Sunburn is caused by excessive exposure to the sun or other ultraviolet light source. Sunburn occurs because the body is unable to make enough melanin.
What are the treatments for sunburns? - To alleviate pain and heat (skin is warm to the touch) caused by the sunburn, take a cool (not cold) bath, or gently apply cool, wet compresses to the skin.
How protect oneself from sunburn? - Sun-protective clothing protects skin from the harmful effects of the sun. Most people benefit from sunscreens with sun protection factor (SPF) numbers of 15 or more. 
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All information is intended for reference only. Please consult your physician for accurate medical advices and treatment. Copyright 2005, health-cares.net, all rights reserved. Last update: July 18, 2005