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What is smallpox?

Smallpox (also known by the Latin names Variola or Variola vera) is a highly contagious disease unique to humans caused by two virus variants called Variola major and Variola minor. V. major is the more deadly form, with a typical mortality of 20-40 percent of those infected. The other type, V. minor, only kills 1% of its victims. Many survivors are left blind, and scarring is nearly universal. Smallpox was responsible for an estimated 300-500 million deaths in the 20th century. As recently as

1967, the World Health Organization (WHO) estimated that 15 million people contracted the disease and that two million died in that year.

After successful vaccination campaigns, the WHO in 1980 declared the eradication of smallpox, though cultures of the virus are kept by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the United States and in Russia. Smallpox vaccination was discontinued in most countries in the 1970s as the risks of vaccination include death (~1 per million), among other serious side effects. Nonetheless, after the 2001 anthrax attacks took place in the United States, concerns about smallpox have resurfaced as a possible agent for bioterrorism. As a result, there has been increased concern about the availability of vaccine stocks. Moreover, President of the United States George W. Bush has ordered all American military personnel to be vaccinated against smallpox and has implemented a voluntary program for vaccinating emergency medical personnel who would likely be the first people to respond in case of a bioterrorist attack.

Famous victims of this disease include Ramses V (not confirmed), Mary II of England, Louis XV of France, and Peter II of Russia. Henry VIII's fourth wife, Anne of Cleves, survived the disease but was scarred by it. A smallpox victim.After first contacts with Europeans, the death of a large part of the native population of the New World was caused by European-transmitted diseases. Smallpox was the chief culprit. On at least one occasion, germ warfare was used by the British army under Jeffrey Amherst when smallpox-infected blankets were deliberately distributed to the Ottawa tribe in 1763.

Smallpox is described in the Ayurveda books. Treatment included inoculation with year-old smallpox matter. The inoculators would travel all across India pricking the skin of the arm with a small metal instrument using "variolous matter" taken from pustules produced by the previous year's inoculations. The effectiveness of this system was confirmed by the British doctor J.Z. Holwell in an account to the College of Physicians in London in 1767.

Edward Jenner developed a smallpox vaccine by using cowpox fluid (hence the name vaccination, from the Latin vaca, (cow); his first inoculation occurred on May 14, 1796. After independent confirmation, this practice of vaccination against smallpox spread quickly in Europe. The first smallpox vaccination in North America occurred on June 2, 1800. National laws requiring vaccination began appearing as early as 1805. The last case of wild smallpox occurred on September 11th, 1977. One last victim was claimed by the disease in the UK in September 1978, when Janet Parker, a photographer in the University of Birmingham Medical School, contracted the disease and died. A research project on smallpox was being conducted in the building at the time, though the exact route by which Ms. Parker became infected was never fully elucidated.

More information on smallpox

What is smallpox? - Smallpox is a highly contagious disease unique to humans caused by two virus variants called Variola major and Variola minor.
What are the symptoms of smallpox? - The initial symptoms of smallpox include the acute onset of fever, chills, headache, nausea, vomiting and severe muscle aches.
How is smallpox spread? - Smallpox is most often spread by the respiratory secretions of people with smallpox to people who have close face to face contact.
What causes smallpox? - Smallpox is caused by variola virus. Anyone exposed to the smallpox virus may get smallpox.
What's the treatment for smallpox? - There is currently no cure for smallpox - although the vaccine can sometimes help those recently exposed.
How can smallpox be prevented? - There is a vaccine to prevent smallpox. Getting smallpox vaccine before exposure will protect about 95 percent of people from getting smallpox.
What is smallpox vaccine? - Smallpox vaccine contains live vaccinia virus, a virus in the orthopoxvirus family and closely related to variola virus, the agent that causes smallpox. 
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All information is intended for reference only. Please consult your physician for accurate medical advices and treatment. Copyright 2005, health-cares.net, all rights reserved. Last update: July 18, 2005